Feed Your Mind: A Story of August Wilson

by Jen Bryant (Author) Cannaday Chapman (Illustrator)

Feed Your Mind: A Story of August Wilson
Reading Level: 2nd − 3rd Grade

A celebration of August Wilson's journey from a child in Pittsburgh to one of America's greatest playwrights

August Wilson (1945-2005) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright who had a particular talent for capturing the authentic, everyday voice of Black Americans. As a child, he read off soup cans and cereal boxes, and when his mother brought him to the library, his whole world opened up. After facing intense prejudice at school from both students and some teachers, August dropped out. However, he continued reading and educating himself independently. He felt that if he could read about it, then he could teach himself anything and accomplish anything. Like many of his plays, Feed Your Mind is told in two acts, revealing how Wilson grew up to be one of the most influential American playwrights. The book includes an author's note, a timeline of August Wilson's life, a list of Wilson's plays, and a bibliography.


School Library Journal

Starred Review

Gr 1-4--Growing up in Pittsburgh in the 1950s with his sisters and his mother, Daisy, August Wilson found refuge in books. Daisy Wilson stressed that knowledge could be a tool of liberation: "If you can read, you can do anything--you can be anything." Wilson's passion for words grew after he obtained his first library card. As the years passed, he devoured anything he could get his hands on, especially the works of Langston Hughes, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Ralph Ellison, and Richard Wright. While Wilson loved to learn, virulent racism forced him to drop out of high school. Nevertheless, his mother's wisdom echoed in his mind. The acceptance of Jitney by the Playwrights' Center in Minneapolis turned the poet into a published playwright. Bryant's text forms a clear and striking portrait of the Pulitzer Prize winner. Bryant's poetic descriptions effectively chronicle Wilson's artistic journey. Chapman's illustrations, created using ink, colored pencil, acrylic paint, and cut paper, bring the narrative to life. Characters feel as though they've been captured in mid-dialogue. Some educators and parents may balk at the usage of the N-word at the beginning of the book, but others may recognize it as an opportunity to teach children about our country's legacy of racism and anti-blackness. VERDICT This empathetic and informative study of August Wilson's early years explores the complexities of the black experience in America. A book that will resonate not only with bookworms and fans of the playwright but with black children wishing to see themselves reflected in the world around them.--Vanessa Willoughby, School Library Journal

Copyright 2019 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

Review quotes

**STARRED REVIEW**

"Bryant's poetic descriptions effectively chronicle Wilson's artistic journey. . . This empathetic and informative study of August Wilson's early years explores the complexities of the black experience in America. A book that will resonate not only with bookworms and fans of the playwright but with black children wishing to see themselves reflected in the world around them." —SLJ Review
Jen Bryant
Jen Bryant writes picture books, novels, and poems for readers of all ages. Her numerous awards include two Caldecott Honors, two ALA Schneider Family Book Awards, an NCTE Orbis Pictus Award and Honor, and a Sibert Medal and Honor. Frank Morrison is the award-winning illustrator of many books for young readers, including two Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor books, a John Steptoe New Talent Award winner, an NAACP Image Award winner, and a Society of Illustrators Silver Medal winner.
Classification
Non-fiction
ISBN-13
9781419736537
Lexile Measure
N/A
Guided Reading Level
N/A
Publisher
Harry N. Abrams
Publication date
November 20, 2019
Series
-

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